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Interviews | International http://indianmusicrevolution.com Fri, 31 Mar 2017 00:29:47 +0000 en-gb Paul Gillis Talks About Professional, Personal & Tripped Up Routine http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Paul-Gillis-Talks-About-Professional-Personal-Tripped-Up-Routine.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Paul-Gillis-Talks-About-Professional-Personal-Tripped-Up-Routine.html

117460 artist

Unleashing the ultimate drug of doom, here comes high yet the awesome Drug Honkey from Chicago. Portraying the dirtiest and trippiest sound like never before, Drug Honkey released it's fourth album mingling with Kunal Choksi of the Transcending Obscurity (previously known as the Diabolical Conquest) on 2012. As their music is becoming much more prevalent in India, we chanced to talk to Paul Gillis, the Honkey Head, handling the Synths/Vocals/Samples/Programming of the band. Here is how the band shed more light into their professional, personal and tripped up routine.

 

IMR: Hello Paul! Greetings from India! How are the guys in Drug Honkey been doing?

Honkey Head: Hello Rupsa, greetings back to you from Chicago. We are doing well, thanks.

 

IMR: Coming straight into the album and your music, I am absolutely blown away by the depth in the music. Could you tell us what is the theme of your band and how did it influence you? And which other acts would be your main influence?

Honkey Head: Well thanks, I'm glad we were able to blow you away. Haha... The theme, hmmm... Not really sure there is a theme. We just do what we do. There really isn't a set idea as to what we do. We just do whatever it is that we do.  As for influences; we have many. A few would be: Winter, Autopsy, Godflesh, Scorn, Plastikman, & Celtic Frost...     

 

IMR: How has the recording of ‘Ghost In The Fire’ been for you guys? What was in your mind when you recorded the album? Has the anticipation been successful?  

Honkey Head: The recording process was relatively smooth, but over a long period of time. We don't rush things, as we have our own recording studio(s). Doom was in our mind along with all the bullshit life throws at you along the way.

The anticipation was definitely successful. The album ended up sounding just as we wanted & it has been very well received overall..

 

IMR: This is your fourth full length album, how has the earlier albums been perceived by the people? How was the experience?

Honkey Head: Some people love our albums & some people not so much.. It is just the nature of the beast when creating music as we do. It's definitely not for everyone, & we are ok with that. When picking up a Drug Honkey album, you either know what you're getting yourself into, or you are willing to open your mind. The last thing we want to give the listener is the same old shit everyone else has already before.

 

IMR: How did you guys couple up with Diabolical Conquest?

Honkey Head: Kunal asked us if we would be interested in working with him & the rest is history.

 

IMR: I have been particularly interested in the artwork of your album. If you could tell us more about it. And how did the band name come into life? Any special significance of the name?

Honkey Head: A friend of mine snapped the shot of that tree. I really liked it, so I took it & added the ghosts, color, atmosphere, etc... It felt very much like what the album encompasses.

Drug Honkey basically means we are the Honky's giving you the key. The key being the music. Hence the spelling Drug Honkey.

 

IMR: How has the rehearsal schedules been for you guys? 

Honkey Head: As of late, we have been in recording mode towards a 4 song EP we are hoping to release by mid 2014. We have been concentrating on that & not "live" shows for the time being.

 

IMR: Could you tell us more about the  lyrical content in 'Ghost In The Fire'? What would the newer audience expect from the lyrics and the songs?

Honkey Head: The lyrics are mainly my subconcious brought to life. Most of them are improv & just happen as the songs are created. It really depends on the mood I'm in at the moment. That determines where I go lyrically, & that tends to be a dark place.

 

IMR: Any new materials on the roll? When can we expect the next drug pill to be unleashed among the audience?

Honkey Head: As I said a bit earlier, expect an EP sometime in 2014.

 

IMR: Any live shows that you guys are doing recently?

Honkey Head: Not lately, as we are concentrating on the new recording. 

 

IMR: What’s your take on the Indian audience? Would you like to come and perform in India in the future? Any Indian bands that guys have heard and look forward to? What are your views regarding the growing scene in India?

Honkey Head: They have been supportive for the most part. There are aot of people in India & we hope to capture them all. We would love to play India, as long as we are taken care of financially as it would be an expensive trek. 

 

IMR: How is the relationship between all the band members? Sheer professionalism, or work and play both? Apart from being a part of the awesome band, what’s your day-job, or profession?

Honkey Head: We are all friends as well as bandmates. We party together, fight together, & even work together from time to time. I am an elevator constructor, Hobbs & Brown Honkey are carpenters & BH Honkey is a studio engineer.

 

IMR: I have heard that you are in another band named 'Morgue Supplier' as well. Is managing two bands, tough? Are other members of the band, part of some different band as well?

Honkey Head: You have heard correctly, I am. It is tough keeping both going, yes. But I love doing it & will continue until I cannot anymore. As far as Drug Honkey goes, I am the only one with another band.

 

IMR: What are your plans for future?

Honkey Head: To make music & play shows.

 

IMR: What would be your message for all our readers?

Honkey Head: If you have an open mind, & love heavy music, Drug Honkey will fufill your needs. Give us a listen.

 

IMR: Thank you, Drug Honkey! For the wonderful time that you have provided us with. I would personally thank you for the awesome album. We wish you all the best for your future endeavors and everything nice and great!

Honkey Head: Thank you for the great interview Rupsa!

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rupsa.das92@gmail.com (Rupsa Das) Interviews Thu, 26 Dec 2013 12:49:29 +0000
Interview With Cold Night For Alligators http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-With-Cold-Night-For-Alligators.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-With-Cold-Night-For-Alligators.html

Cold Night For Alligators Interview

Touted to be one of Denmark's most promising acts, with a host of accolades to their name, Cold Night For Alligators, are one artist that deserves much more credit than given to them. With successful stints at Norway and UK to their name including the prestigious UK TechMetal Fest, Cold Night For Alligators are riding the crest of the massive buzz they have generated with an eclectic mix of Technical Hardcore coupled with Technical Death Metal and the likes, bounded by a thick slab of groove and ambient soundscapes.

 

 

Having released their entire body of work for a “Pay As You Want” scheme on their Bandcamp page, Cold Night For Alligators have been busy working on their next offering. In the meantime they found themselves headlining at Dhanak, IIST, in late September. Amidst the amusing tidings of their first visit to the country the humble lads in CNFA sat down with us for an interview. This is what transpired.

IMR: Hey there dudes, how’s everything in Camp CNFA?

Everything is great! - a lot of really exciting stuff happening at the moment.

 

IMR:  2013 seemed to be a busy year for you, what with the release of your “Young Catalysts” and “Tranisitions” singles, not to mention the UK trip which saw you sharing stages with The Color Line and also playing alongside Monuments and TesseracT, Pheww! So what’s up next for you lads?

Now we have had our first trip outside Europe and what a blast! Hopefully we will be back in India sometime soon!

Now we are going to continue writing our debut album which will be released in 2014. We have a few festival dates sorted in start of 2014 but else we wouldn’t be playing many shows before the release of the album. When it gets released we will be playing as much as possible, both national and international.

 

IMR: How would you define Cold Night For Alligators for the uninitiated? What does CNFA, with its lyrical themes and ambient-meets-brutal compositions represent? 

CNFA is a band that brings whatever they like musically into the music they create. Our sort of main expression is obviously metal, but still, we belive that what sounds good is good, and o we bring it into our music. So how would we define ourselves? By saying the CNFA is an honest picture of what its five individuals represent. 

 

IMR: How did you guys come up with such an interesting name for the band? More importantly how did CNFA come into existence?

As some may know, we got the name off a font online. We weren't that into the font itself, but we liked the sound of it. But most of all we wanted a name that wouldn't instantly label us or put us in a box, for which this seemed like a perfect fit.

A few of us (Kristoffer, Jack, and Roar) merged from another band because we all wanted to play more heavy stuff than the grunge we were playing at that time. From the initial thoughts on what music we were going to play we've evolved quite a bit, but we love everything about it.

 

IMR: How does CNFA tackle the songwriting process? Also if you could give us any details on when your next studio effort is going to brutalize our ears, that would be awesome. 

Mostly a guitar or drum part is written and then added the touch of the others afterwards. Normally that happens in front of the computer, and when enough pieces are created, we go into our rehearsal facility and play it and turn it into a complete song.

Hopefully or most likely our debut album will be out sometime next year.

 

IMR: Seeing that all of your works are available for free on Bandcamp, how do you breakeven as a group of working individuals, from this? Is this your tactic against the whole Internet piracy/Illegal downloads shebang? Do you plan to change this in the future with lengthier releases? Would you consider the crowd-funded method?

It’s difficult to be a small band and it costs a lot of money. When you can’t get thousands of people to attend your show you don’t much money by playing. The best way to get people to your shows is to attract them with good music. Because of this we believe it’s best to give away our music for free. We want as many as possible to check us out and hopefully they like it and will catch us live.

Right now it costs a lot of money but we believe this is the best way.

 

IMR: What are your thoughts on the genre based biasing that is so rampant in the community these days? What do you have to day to those who lump your band with one category or the other?

We don't really pay that much attention to it. We feel we do what we do best, and that is to play music. We have been placed in so many categories and that's quite perfect for us, since we strive to be ourselves in every situation, and when we are, people consider us to be very versatile, which is a good thing. 

 

IMR: What Metal bands do you listen to? What do you listen to when you are not listening to Metal?

Well, i'm a big killswitch engage fan, so i gotta mention them, and i've been listening to: Fit for a king, Lower definition, Erra, Devil sold his soul and Hands like houses.

My not metal bands are: City and colour, Deaf havana, I the mighty, the Elijah and a danish artist called Rasmus Seebach.

 

IMR: Recently in July CNFA played the main stage at the UK Tech Metal Fest. What was it like to share the stage with some of the biggest names in the industry today? What experiences did you take away individually from the UKTMF episode? 

It is alway a great experience to play with great bands of the scene. By getting these kind of gigs we get the opportunity to play in front of a bigger crowd on bigger stages than normal.

The show at UK Tech Fest was a great experience for us. It seems like people really liked our music and our live show which really gives us a lot of confidence that we take with us to the next shows.

 

IMR: We hear that you challenged the lads from Monuments for a football friendly at the UKTMF; what was the outcome? How big fans are you when it comes to football? What are your thoughts and predictions for the World Cup that would be held next year? 

Unfortunately Monuments didn’t dare to play us when the day arrived. We are more than willing to give them another chance if they are up for it 

We are all big fans of football. Unfortunately the Danish national team isn’t at the top right now. The way to the world cup in Brazil seems really difficult – we need the old days with the Laudrup brothers and Schmeichel in the goal 

Perhaps the coach should think of getting some of us on the team. We always bring a ball with us on tour and use lot of time playing samba ball. Some say we look like FC Barcelona when we are playing with each other ;-)

 

IMR: What’s the next step for CNFA as a band? What can your fans expect from you next? Where do you see yourselves 3-5 years from now?

Right now the most important thing for us is to write our debut album. We hope to get this out in first half of 2014. The album will be produced by Daniel Braunstein, who did our two new singles, and we can’t wait to hear the output!

 

IMR: Would you give us a little insight into what is it like being a nascent Metal band from the Danish circuit? Tell us something that’s uniquely Danish Metal, and won’t be found anywhere else outside the scene.

It's hard to be a metal band from Denmark, cuz the metal scene isn't very big. There are only 6 million people in Denmark, so it's quite hard to get noticed.

Hvis der er nogen der har noget at tilføje eller her må i meget gerne skrive noget, for jeg er blank?

 

IMR: The gig at Dhanak, IIST, would be your first show outside Europe; what are you looking forward to the most, on this trip?  

Exactly, It is our first trip outside Europe, and that's why it's a special moment for us. At some point, we always wanted to come here, and now it's actually happening, so we are really honored to finally being here. - You can be sure that this will also have affect our show at Dhanak 13´. It's going down!

 

IMR: “Cold Night For Alligators” has a dedicated fanbase to its name. Are you aware of the Indian Metal scene or the bands from here?

Before going to India, I had no idea, cuz you always hear about the Bollywood scene and that's so huge over here, so i had no idea that metal could thrive here. But I told by one of the guys who have been taking care of us, that there are a lot of metal bands over here and that the metal scene is growing fast, and that to me is amazing.

 

IMR: This is your space, in case you want to share anything with your fans, especially the Indian ones.

A MASSIVE THANK YOU TO EVERYONE SUPPORTING US! We really appreciate any support we get, whether it’s a like on Facebook, someone attending our show or buying some of our merch.

We had the most amazing time in India and the crowd at Dhanak was fantastic! We really hope to be back in the future.

PS. Your food is so delicious, but a bit hot spicy for us.

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arkadeepdeb@in.com (Arkadeep Deb) Interviews Mon, 14 Oct 2013 07:08:29 +0000
Interview With Lukasz Dziamarski (Preludium) http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-With-Lukasz-Dziamarski-Preludium.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-With-Lukasz-Dziamarski-Preludium.html

 

Lukasz Dziamarski Preludium Interview

Polish Martial attack as they say, Impending hostility upon us. These black/death metallers came out with their demo and in 2004 they released "Eternal Wrath" which was so well perceived by the people that it had to be re-issued on 2008. They released another bestial album 'Rape Mankind Disorder' and then 'Abominations' EP which earned them loads of accolades all over. They were hence noticed by Kunal Choksi, of Transcending Obscurity (then known as Diabolical Conquest) and hence released the album 'Impending Hostility' on 2010 with Diabolical Conquest records. Impending Hostility is a heavy and skull-crushing release with monster of a vocal, the constant tough guitars and bone hammering drums. We had a chance to catch up with the monster of a vocalist of the band, Lukasz Dziamarski and to shed more light about the release and the band and more fun!

IMR: Hello Lukasz! Greetings from India! How are the guys in Preludium been doing?

Lukasz: Hello Rupsa, we are very good thank you. We are preparing to record fourth album and we can't wait for it.

 

IMR: Coming straight into the album and your music, could you tell me how the theme of war influenced the band? And which other acts would be your main influence?

Lukasz: The idea of war theme album was the figment of Janek's imagination. He is main composer of our music. The war is the core influence of lyrics and artwork of our latest album. When it comes to music, we used a few parts resembling the marching style. The range of our influence is placed within many genres of music. Our main goal is to create well arranged kicking ass brutal songs with gloomy climate.

 

IMR: How has the recording of ‘Impending Hostility’ been for you guys? What was in your mind when you recorded the album? Has the anticipation been successful?

Lukasz: Recording session proceeded very smoothly. We always are well prepared to the sessions. One new thing was that we had to finish 'Blessing Of War' in the studio. When we started to record Piotr wanted to turn up the tempo of some songs so we had to finish this song because 'Impending Hostility' would be less than half an hour long ;) Of course many things could have been made better but everyone says this kind of crap in the interviews.

 

IMR: How did you guys couple up with Diabolical Conquest?

Lukasz: A few years ago I received an email from Kunal with a link to 'Raping Mankind Disorder' review. Kunal was very enthusiastic about our second album and we started to email each other. After recording 'Impeding Hostility' I asked Kunal if he could help us with finding new label. Since he led Diabolical Conquest webzine he had lots of connections in metal music community. After few months he informed me about plans of setting his own label. His conditions were acceptable for us. In addition to that we were convinced about his faith in Preludium so this was main incentive why we decided to accept his terms.

 

IMR: I have been particularly interested in this African instrument that you guys have used in your previous release ‘Rape Mankind Disorder’ that gave off a pretty creepy sound. What is that instrument called, and how did you guys think of implementing that? Also, what specific type of instrument did you guys use to bring out the heaviness in ‘Impending Hostility’, if you could share with us.

Lukasz:We used didgeridoo both on 'Eternal Wrath' and 'Raping Mankind Disorder'. We have a friend who has a few types of these instruments and helped us with the recordings. On 'Eternal Wrath' we used it only in the final song “The Book Ov Signs” whereas on 'Raping Mankind Disorder' we used it on 2 regular songs: “Inhumane Obsession”, “Anti-God's Lament”, “Desecration By Fire” and “Ultimate Judgement” Death metal with Didgeridoo elements sounds indeed unique so we decided to create instrumental “Origin” with didgeridoo as a leading motif woven into the music .

 

IMR: How has the rehearsal schedules been for you guys? I have heard that you have to travel by train from another city? That’s really an awesome dedication. How do you manage that?

Lukasz: I moved from my hometown Mielec to Cracow to study 10 yrs ago. I still live since I got a good job here. Mielec is only 2 hours way from Cracow so it is not so far. The rest of the guys still live in my hometown. I come back there usually at the weekends every 2-3 weeks and then we can play rehearsals with Preludium.

 

IMR: Could you tell us more about the artwork and the lyrical content in ‘Impending Hostility’?

Lukasz: The author of lyrics in 'Impending Hostility' is Janek. He drew inspiration from various military films and books. This is not conceptual album, however the common denominator of all the lyrics is the war theme. There are lots of death, pain and suffering, typical death metal poems.

The front cover and the booklet were my very own ideas. I wanted to make it look like an old photo; cold, bleak without any texts any photos but for the battlefield background. Moreover, the layout resembles the music content. Author of this artwork is Wojciech, our former bass player. He was part of Preludium on 'Eternal Wrath' and 'Raping Mankind Disorder' (he made for us artworks for 'Raping Mankind Disorder' and 'Abomination').

 

IMR: I have heard, that in your next album, there would be lyrics based on spirituality inspired by the teachings of Sri Sri Paramahansa Yogananda. How did this idea dawn upon your band? Spiritual much?

Lukasz: I asked Kunal to help us with texts. We wanted to make them different and insightful.

 

IMR: Any live shows that you guys are doing recently?

Lukasz: No, we made last live show about one year ago with Ulcerate, Svart Crown and Polish bands Hell United and Beheading Machine. We’ve had a few inquiries about playing live concerts, however we decided to focus on composing new songs. We don't have rehearsals very often so we can't afford to spend our time on practicing our live set. High pressure to create new songs is stronger. When we record and release our new album we’ll play live shows as often as it is possible.

 

IMR: What’s your take on the Indian audience? Would you like to come and perform in India in the future? Any Indian bands that guys have heard and look forward to?

Lukasz: I am afraid I don't know any Indian band. I received many facebook invitations from Kunal's friends. We’d love to perform in your country very much but I think this is very difficult in logistic way. The biggest problem is the price of the plane tickets. Of course when someone wants to invite us let us know haha. It might be very interesting experience.

 

IMR: How is the relationship between all the bandmembers? Sheer professionalism, or work and play both? Apart from being a part of the awesome band, what’s your day-job, or profession?

Lukasz: We are friends and between the rehearsals we meet for a beer or maybe a bottle of vodka. Piotr, our drummer is unemployed at the moment, rest have a casual jobs. I’m working in a shipping company, Marcin, bass player works, in logistic and Janek works in a big international company which makes aircrafts.

 

IMR: I would love to own a t-shirt of your band. Do you guys plan to be out with t-shirts and other merchandise?

Lukasz: Yes, we have plans to issue t-shirts to our latest album. We have a t-shirt design and we are waiting for printing them. Project is made by Upgrade Design Studio www.facebook.com/upgradestudiopl. Kunal will print and sell them under the flag of Diabolical Conquest Rec which is now known as Transcending Obscurity.

 

IMR: What are your plans for future?

Lukasz: In April we are starting the record session of our new album. We haven't named the album title yet. There will be 10-11 songs with new influences. There will be more atmosphere and black metal parts but you can still sense the style of Preludium.

I don't know what’ll happen after that. Maybe a few concerts, we are too old to make a glittering big career out of this…. We’ve released 3 albums and 1 ep, we are happy as far as we can create new songs and play it out loud haha.

 

IMR: What would be your message for our readers?

Lukasz: First of all I would like to Thank you for your interest and support. I hope we someday can play in your country for Indian maniacs.

 

Thank you, Preludium! For the wonderful time that you have provided us with. I would personally thank you for the awesome album. We wish you all the best for your future endeavors and everything nice.

 

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rupsa.das92@gmail.com (Rupsa Das) Interviews Thu, 28 Mar 2013 02:24:13 +0000
Mallika Sundaramurthy Talks About Abnormality's Debut Album! http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Mallika-Sundaramurthy-Talks-About-Abnormality-s-Debut-Album.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Mallika-Sundaramurthy-Talks-About-Abnormality-s-Debut-Album.html

Mallika Sundaramurthy Abnormality IMR Interview

Abnormality is an Extreme Metal band formed in 2005, hailing from Massachusetts, United States. They're a female fronted band, pursuing the heaviest sub-genre of Death Metal and providing us with a brilliant hybrid between technicality, speed and some devastating grooves. I recently had the oppurtunity to review their first full length album, "Contaminating The Hive Mind" and had a chit-chat with the vocalist, Mallika Sundaramurthy, regarding the album and much more.

If you did not check the band out yet then please do and give them a like on their official Facebook page. And keep a lookout for their new releases and uploads on their official YouTube page. 

IMR: Hello Mallika. Nice to catch up with you. How are you doing? And how are the boys doing?
Mallika Sundaramurthy: Hi Rupsa, I’m well thanks. They boys are doing well also. We are just adjusting back to normal life after our tour last month.

IMR: Tell us something about the recent album, "Contaminating The Hive Mind"!
Mallika Sundaramurthy: We are proud of the new album. It’s definitely a progression for the band. We put a lot of time and effort into the song writing. We believe it’s a strong album start to finish.

IMR: How was it working with Abnormality? How did the recording session go with you?
Mallika Sundaramurthy: This was our 4th time in the studio, but our first full length release. The recording process went smoothly for us. We worked with the same producer as the 2010 EP; Pete Rutcho (Damage Productions). He is easy to work with and he knows how to bring out the best in us.

IMR: I personally loved this album. What aspect would listeners look forward to in this album?
Mallika Sundaramurthy: Thank you. I think it’s a good mix of technicality, brutality, and groove, and there are a lot of memorable parts.

IMR: Any special incident during the recording session or the tour that happened which you would like to share with the readers?
Mallika Sundaramurthy: There’s not really just one particular incident that stands out overall. Probably the best part of the last tour was playing Las Vegas Death Fest. It was an honor to play with some of the best Death Metal bands from the US and around the world like Disgorge, Severed Savior, Inherit Disease, Carnal Decay, Abuse, Guttural Secrete and others. The crowd was great, and the fest was really well organized. We had a great time playing, hanging out, drinking, and watching all the other bands.

IMR: Any personal favorite from the album?
Mallika Sundaramurthy: I have a few personal favorites from the album, "A Chaos Reserved", "Taste Of Despair", and the title track.

IMR: What would be your message to all our readers? And from where can the listeners pick up the album from? Any details?
Mallika Sundaramurthy: Support Death Metal! The music industry is hurting, even more so underground music. Go to local shows, and buy music and merch from the bands. It keeps Underground Metal alive! I want to take a second to thank our fans and everyone that has supported Abnormality in the 7 years of its existence. We couldn’t do it without you!
You can pick up the new album at www.sevared.com and at our Big Cartel page. It’s also available digitally at sites like iTunes, Bandcamp, Amazon, CD Baby and more.

IMR: Thank you for sparing us with your precious time, Mallika. We wish you and the whole band all the best!
Mallika Sundaramurthy: My pleasure. Thanks Rupsa.

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rupsa.das92@gmail.com (Rupsa Das) Interviews Sun, 15 Jul 2012 07:48:36 +0000
Dhishti Talks About Meditation Of Death Tour & More http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Dhishti-Talks-About-Meditation-Of-Death-Tour-More.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Dhishti-Talks-About-Meditation-Of-Death-Tour-More.html

Dhishti India_Tour_Interview

Sri Lankan Black Metal band DHISHTI, made their second tour to India in the month of January and ending in the month of February, named Meditation Of Death Tour. An insight of the tour has been provided to us by the guitarist, Ramindu Sanka Deshapriya and the vocalist Jayakody Marlin. We would like to thank both of them for taking the time out for us and writing such elating words for us. We would also like to thank the whole band for helping us cover them. Here’s what the band has to say about their tour to India.

IMR: How old is DHISHTI and how popular are you guys in your motherland Sri Lanka?
DHISHTI: DHISHTI was started in early 2009 as a studio band by Jayakody and Deshapriya. So you could say DHISHTI is a rather young band. However, we have a strong underground fanbase in Sri Lanka. We have followers coming to our shows mainly from the suburbs of Colombo, Kandy and Gampaha as well as other areas around the country.
On the other hand would like to make it clear that we are not in this to make money or to get popular out of this. If it's popularity we want we wouldn't be doing what we do in the first place. We do music for our self satisfaction and that only. If people like what we do they can support us, if they share the same views as us they can come for our live shows and listen to our music.

IMR: How has Sri Lanka treated your band, over the years?
DHISHTI: Better than we could have ever hoped for. The response to our music has been enormous and has grown exponentially over the years. Although at our first gig people were quite put off by our style of music, they have grown to love Atmospheric/Depressive Black Metal which resulted in a huge wave of DSBM and Atmospheric Black Metal bands springing up from the Sri Lankan Metal scene. To this day, we have a loyal following of Sri Lankan fans who expect to see us perform at every gig in Sri Lanka and trip out to our music after consuming various intoxicants.
Our lyrical and musical themes have also been greatly appreciated in recent years. Our fans have grown along with the band, maturing in their appreciation of our music and the concepts we attempt to portray through it. More fans are asking for the lyrics to our songs, and in our opinion, this is a very important turning point, because finally our fans from Sri Lanka are understanding what DHISHTI stands for and the message we are trying to convey.

IMR: Black-Metal, a highly underrated genre. What made you guys go for it?
DHISHTI: Rather than us actually going for Black Metal, we believe that the Black Metal genre was chosen for us by who we are. Black Metal is based fundamentally around individualism and we are stoic supporters of that. Uniqueness and having something to believe in is very important for a Black Metal artist.
Although Black Metal is considered to be underrated, it must be said that Black Metal is a self-serving genre, rather than one which depends on a horde of supporters. However, there are large amounts of people who truly believe in Black Metal and are true to its core concepts around the world, and this following helps keep the scene active and interesting.

IMR: Your recent release, is in Sinhala, I presume. Has language ever created any barrier for you guys? What does DHISHTI mean and what message does the song NEECHA PAPA convey to people?
DHISHTI: Yes, NEECHA PAPA and all the songs on our upcoming LIFE IS SUFFERING album will be in Sinhala, our mother tongue. We primarily make music for our own pleasure so we would never consider language as a ‘barrier’, rather, what we feel is that these ideas so close to the culture of the Sinhalese people should be conveyed in the Sinhala language.
The name DHISHTI refers to an evil spirit in our culture. This spirit can be manifested in the form of an animal or a demon and be used to do one’s bidding. Generally the use of a "dhishti" is to bring misfortune and suffering upon those who have wronged you. In essence, the message we want to convey through our name is that of a "dhishti" which will bring doom to the various invaders who have ravaged the peaceful land of Sri Lanka over many millennia. The song NEECHA PAPA is an extension of this concept. NEECHA PAPA directly translates in to ‘abhorrent sin’, and we consider the atrocities committed on the Sri Lankan people by various European and other invaders throughout the years as the abhorrent sins which cannot be forgiven. NEECHA PAPA speaks of the pain and misery that will be visited upon these abhorrent sinners through the invocation of a "dhishti".

IMR: Being in our neighbouring country, how does it feel to get recognition in India?
DHISHTI: Since quite a while back, the Sri Lankan and Indian Metal scenes have been very closely linked. The biggest Sri Lankan bands are well-known and appreciated in India, just as the most popular Indian bands are well-known in Sri Lanka. As we have emphasized, we play music for our own pleasure but it is gratifying to know that there are people in India who enjoy our music and agree with our concepts.

IMR: How has Indian soil treated you, with your "Meditation Of Death Tour"?
DHISHTI: It has been a mixed bag, really. First of all we must say that the crowd that turned up for all 4 gigs on the tour were awesome. Although our brand of music was something totally new and alien to most of them, those who could appreciate our music enjoyed themselves and made it a point to express to us how much they did. Apart from a few minor hiccups, the organizers of the 4 concerts were highly professional, and in this respect we must give special mention to Kunal, Ajaya and Vignesh from Mumbai, Hozo from Darjeeling and David from Guwahati, and it was an honor to perform at gigs set up by such dedicated organizers.
India in general treated us very well other than the train rides, which were pretty hectic. We spent about 5 days in total on the train throughout the tour. That’s a lot when you consider sitting in a box with nothing to do and being harassed by various people. Other than the train rides, India was a great place to be in and the people from the Metal scene that we met were absolutely awesome, and they made it an unforgettable experience for us.

IMR: Are you guys happy with the turn-out in India? How were the sale, and the CD recognition here?
DHISHTI: We are very happy with the turn-out at the Mumbai, Darjeeling and Guwahati gigs. There were less people at the Bangalore gig, but we always say that we will perform even to 5 people who enjoy our music, so we were never really that concerned about how many people turned out for the gigs as long as they enjoyed themselves and appreciated what we were trying to say. In that respect it must be said that we met some awesome fans at the Bangalore gig as well. Some of our merchandise, which consisted of the Meditation Of Death Tour (Digipack) and T-shirt, got sold at every gig we played at.

IMR: What do you think is the reputation of your band in India (as perceived by you guys)?
DHISHTI: The feeling we got was that we are quite well known among fans of Black Metal and Depressive Metal. In many places we performed, especially Mumbai and Guwahati, groups of hardcore Depressive Suicidal Black Metal fans met and spoke with us, claiming that they are ardent fans of our music. In Darjeeling, it was their first taste of Depressive Black Metal, but our reputation preceded us and there were many fans who were quite interested to see us perform.
We think that in India we are recognized for what we are; the only Depressive/Atmospheric Black Metal band that performs live in this region. Our releases are known within the Underground Metal community of India. Of course, when we released the music video for NEECHA PAPA, we would have had an exponential increase of our popularity in India, but we like to believe that we have a hardcore following in your country that are very interested in the music we have to offer.

IMR: This is your second tour in India. How has the first tour been for you guys?
DHISHTI: We first toured India when we came to the first edition of Black Metal Kreig in Mumbai in 2010. That was a very interesting experience for us as we got to see what India has to offer in terms of Black Metal, and also the response that Indian Metal fans have for an all-Black Metal gig. In Sri Lanka we are used to having a Metal culture in which Black Metal plays a very prominent role, so we were rather disappointed to find that the scene in India was not that advanced.
On the other hand, we became acquainted with many interesting people while on that tour and made friends who have been with the band since those days and have supported us a lot on this tour as well. We also made friends with members of the bands from the Indian Black Metal scene and alliances were made which led to many interesting musical collaborations, including 1833 AD’s July 2011 tour of Sri Lanka.
We feel that we also matured a great deal as a band as a result of that tour. Of course, we have changed quite a bit and refined our sound a great deal during the past year or so before we went on our Meditation Of Death Tour.

IMR: Give us some insight of the second tour(Meditation Of Death Tour) in India?
DHISHTI: Our second tour of India, titled the Meditation Of Death Tour, was organized primarily through the efforts of FRAMESHIFT INITIATIVES, which is an artist management company based primarily in Mumbai, Maharashtra. The tour consisted of 4 gigs around India starting in Mumbai with Black Metal Kreig II on the 21st of January, then moving on to Darjeeling Meta-Legion Fest on the 27th of January, followed by Stormbringer II in Guwahati on the 30th of January and Metal Rage on the 4th of February in Bangalore.
To speak in very general terms about the tour, we are very happy about how it turned out; all 4 gigs went smoothly in terms of how we performed and the response from the crowd. There were a few minor hiccups along the way but we guess that is to be expected in tours of this magnitude.

IMR: In your second tour, you guys have covered almost the main states in India. How different has the experience been?
DHISHTI: It isn’t possible to think of our experiences on the two tours of India as even remotely related. Last time, we came to Mumbai and stayed for 4 days including the day of the gig. This time around, it was a roller-coaster ride of moving from location to location and performing at gigs in front of crowds who were completely different from each other. What we can say with absolute conviction is that we thoroughly enjoyed ourselves despite any problems we may have had along the way. Travelling to exotic destinations like Darjeeling and experiencing the different cultures within different states is an experience not to be forgotten. To put it in absolutely simple terms, it was the experience of a lifetime. This time around, we really felt India in bones rather than merely seeing it with our eyes.

IMR: Has India welcomed you as you guys anticipated?
DHISHTI: We were never expecting a massive reception and apart from basic amenities we weren’t expecting a lot of luxury on our tour either. However, it must be said that the people we met everywhere we met, especially people from the Metal community, were absolutely hospitable and welcoming. We are glad to have seen the brotherhood and friendship within the Indian Metal hordes, and to have been able to experience it first hand.

IMR: Any personal hilarious experience ?
DHISHTI: We travelled to to the different states we were performing in by train, which gave us a total of about 5 days of train travel throughout the whole tour. We travelled sleeper class, and it was quite an experience. The transvestites on the train was something we never expected. Knowing we were foreigners, they seemed to enjoy annoying us as much as possible, especially Alles! Towards the end we ended up dreading the clapping noise they made which signalled their arrival. Anyway, it was not such a big deal as by giving them the ‘stink-eye’ we could always make them go away, eventually.

IMR: How was the onstage experience here, different from that in Sri-Lanka ?
DHISHTI: It wouldn’t be wise to compare the onstage experiences at the 4 gigs we played in India, let alone comparing them to the on-stage experience in Sri Lanka. We don’t think we can generalize in terms of the onstage experience in India, because we played at venues where the people listening to our music were completely different from each other culturally and in terms of the music they follow. The physical conditions on each stage were completely different from each other as well. In Mumbai we performed at a professional gig venue with a killer sound setup, in Darjeeling we performed at a temperature below 5 degree celcius at a venue that is probably the most underground venue we have seen so far, in Guwahati and Bangalore we performed at small venues designed to suit other purposes than Metal gigs. The on-stage experience varied along with these factors. It must be said, though, that the crowd at all these venues were very supportive and responded to our music similarly to the crowds in Sri Lanka.

IMR: Any special mention about people? Anyone you want to thank?
DHISHTI: There are so many people who helped us in many different ways throughout the tour.
Ajaya Bhat and Vignesh Iyer from FRAMESHIFT INITIATIVES, who set up the whole tour and managed everything from gigs to where we stayed.
Kunal, Felix, Souvik and Ruark from STARK DENIAL, for working so hard to organize Black Metal Krieg II in Mumbai.
Hozo and the Darjeeling Meta-Legion, they are a hardcore crowd who would do anything for Metal. They were the organizers of the Darjeeling Meta-Legion Fest in Darjeeling.
David from Guwahati who did such a great job organizing Stormbringer II.
Sandesh Shenoy and all the guys who helped us.
Victor from De’Sat for giving us a place to stay while we were in Bangalore.
Gurdip and the members of GUTSLIT for an awesome night of drinking and for arranging for us to stay at a fantastic hotel.
Rupsa Das and her friends for looking after us for a whole day in Kolkata, while we waited to switch trains.
Sharnya Natrajan and Aishwarya Tipnis, two very good friends from Mumbai who have stayed in touch with us since our tour in 2010.
Aishwarya Basangar for being such a reliable friend and for looking after us when we returned to Mumbai after the gig in Bangalore.
Imran, whom we met on the train to Kolkata, who cheered us up considerably when we were down and making the hardships on the train seem funny rather than painful.

IMR: Has your tour been a successful endeavour? What message would you like to give India?
DHISHTI: It has been one hell of a tour, and there is no doubt in our minds that it was successful. We just hope that the people who witnessed us perform understood the message we were trying to put across. More than anything, we hope that the many interesting individuals we met on our journey had something to gain from it.
The Indian Black Metal scene is growing fast and we hope that the great bands we met and performed alongside will keep up their good work and strive to take the message of Black Metal to every metalhead in the country.
The final message we’d like to give is: be true to yourself; have the backbone to follow your own path, and take responsibility for it. Celebrate your individuality and uniqueness.

]]>
rupsa.das92@gmail.com (Rupsa Das) Interviews Mon, 12 Mar 2012 10:47:24 +0000
Interview With Matti Svatitzki Of Orphaned Land http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-With-Matti-Svatitzki-Of-Orphaned-Land.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-With-Matti-Svatitzki-Of-Orphaned-Land.html

Orphaned Land Matti Svatitzki Interview IMR

ORPHANED LAND is a Israeli Doom/Death/Progressive Metal band which spans a musical journey of more than 20 years.
Incorporating "jewish" and "arabic" influences into their lyrical landscaping - the band are the pioneers of the middle-eastern Progressive Metal genre. The striking factor lies in the fact that the band fuses traditional middle-eastern instruments with modern guitars and drums to create a completely different yet melodic sound.The band has a unique stage presence as well. With traditional jewish, muslim and christian attires, the band sends a strong message of religious harmony not just through their costumes but also their lyrical themes.

The band toured India last year and are set to perform again - 5th February at the IIT Guwahati festival and 7th february at the QBA club in New Delhi.On the eve of their return, we caught them between their flights and had a chat!

IMR: ORPHANED LAND has fallen in love with India – a second tour in a year’s span – how does that feel guys?
Matti Svatitzki: It feels really great. We love India, love the atmosphere and love the people. Some of us were in India for travels even before the shows, and we can't wait to get to India for more shows.

IMR: You’ll pleased your fans from India last time as well as added a huge new following – what exciting things can we expect from you’ll this time?
Matti Svatitzki: Last time we really had fun. The shows were amazing, and people were totally into it. I don't know what will happen now, but if you say we have increased our fan base then I hope this is the case. We're as curious as you about these shows and we'll have to wait and see.

IMR: Your recent release (THE NEVER ENDING WAY OF THE ORWARRIOR) was voted as one of the top Progressive Metal albums of 2011 – from an underground band to a ground-breaking band; tell us your journey in brief?
Matti Svatitzki: It'll be hard to sum it up in only a few words, because we exist for over 20 years and have been through a lot. We began as a Death Metal band when we were teenagers, and with the years we adopted the Middle Eastern style and blended it into our music. We recorded 4 full length albums, and performed with them all around the world. There's a lot more to be told, but you can't squeeze a career of 20 years in just a few rows.

IMR: When most of the bands perform leather clad, sporting tattoos, ORPHANED LAND has a unique stage presentation and costumes. Tell us more about it and how it reflects your culture?
Matti Svatitzki: Kobi, our vocalist, usually goes on stage wearing a galaba, which is a traditional Arab outfit. The other band members, we used to go up on stage dressed up as orthodox Jewish people, and orthodox Muslim people. We wore these outfits first of all because it's cool. It's a part of who we are and what our music is about. It is easier for audience who doesn't know us to get connected to our music.

IMR: Along with guitars, bass and drums – there are a lot of "eastern folk music" instruments we get to hear on your albums – tell us something more about them.
Matti Svatitzki: These instruments are also a lot about who we are. Middle-Eastern Folk Metal is a style which we are its pioneers, we started making it a long years ago and stayed with it since. We thought about how to bring into our music instruments that are native and from the place we come from, and we use instruments from all around the Middle East, places like Egypt, Turkey, Greece and even more. We use these instruments a lot in our albums, and also, when we can, in our live shows as well.

IMR: Your latest album was mixed by Steven Wilson (PORCUPINE TREE) – how did this collaboration take place?
Matti Svatitzki: Steven is spends a lot of time in Israel since he is working with the local artist Aviv Geffen on their project BLACKFIELD. We got close to Steven during his stays here and got him interested in our music. Steven has worked and produced legendary albums before, and it is a privilege that he is a good friend of ours, and that he's working with us. He also sang one of our songs live in our last DVD and made a perfect 10 cover.

IMR: Your music tries to find the commonality between all the Abrahamic Religions (Judaism, Christianity and Islam) – how did your culture/country influence you while choosing this theme for your albums?
Matti Svatitzki: Religion is a central issue in the world. Most of the world is religious, so talking about religion from our point of view is a relevant thing. Israel is a place from which Judaism and Christianity came, Jesus was born and died on the cross here, and some cities in Israel are extremely sacred for Muslims too. Places here are so sacred to people, that they are really to fight and die for them, and this is exactly where our music and message fit in. We preach for friendship and kindness between people, for ask people to keep open minds and try to see eye to eye with each other. We have many fans in the Arab world, with whom we have very warm and positive relationship, and
we look at them as our brothers, sure not as enemies.

IMR: ORPHANED LAND is classified as Doom or more commonly Progressive Metal – how would you describe your overall sound?
Matti Svatitzki: I think we have been all over the place. There were times in the past when we were considered a Doom-Death band, and in later times we were considered more Prog-Metal band. It depended on the mood we were in and the music we listened to at home when we wrote the music.

IMR: Your music treads on a religious path – did you guys encounter any hurdles while touring etc?
Matti Svatitzki: Up until now there haven't been any extraordinary events. There were some minor anti-Semite events, some guy waved a small Swastika pendant in my face and said "fuck off", and a few small things like that, but except for a few
assholes everything has been good so far.

IMR: Finally, a message from the band to their fans and budding musicians who are inspired by you guys. Thank You!
Matti Svatitzki: It is great that we have a fan base in India! We really love the place, and it is important for us that people get to know and appreciate what we do. We 4 can't wait to play for you guys soon, see you there!

ORPHANED LAND is a Israeli Doom/Death/Progressive Metal band which spans a musical journey of more than 20 years.
Incorporating "jewish" and "arabic" influences into their lyrical landscaping - the band are the pioneers of the

middle-eastern Progressive Metal genre. The striking factor lies in the fact that the band fuses traditional middle-eastern

instruments with modern guitars and drums to create a completely different yet melodic sound.The band has a unique stage

presence as well. With traditional jewish, muslim and christian attires, the band sends a strong message of religious harmony

not just through their costumes but also their lyrical themes.

The band toured India last year and are set to perform again - 5th February at the IIT Guwahati festival and 7th february at

the QBA club in New Delhi.On the eve of their return, we caught them between their flights and had a chat!

IMR: ORPHANED LAND has fallen in love with India – a second tour in a year’s span – how does that feel guys?
Matti Svatitzki: It feels really great. We love India, love the atmosphere and love the people. Some of us were in India for

travels even before the shows, and we can't wait to get to India for more shows.

IMR: You’ll pleased your fans from India last time as well as added a huge new following – what exciting things can we expect

from you’ll this time?
Matti Svatitzki: Last time we really had fun. The shows were amazing, and people were totally into it. I don't know what will

happen now, but if you say we have increased our fan base then I hope this is the case. We're as curious as you about these

shows and we'll have to wait and see.

IMR: Your recent release (THE NEVER ENDING WAY OF THE ORWARRIOR) was voted as one of the top Progressive Metal albums of 2011

– from an underground band to a ground-breaking band; tell us your journey in brief?
Matti Svatitzki: It'll be hard to sum it up in only a few words, because we exist for over 20 years and have been through a

lot. We began as a Death Metal band when we were teenagers, and with the years we adopted the Middle Eastern style and

blended it into our music. We recorded 4 full length albums, and performed with them all around the world. There's a lot more

to be told, but you can't squeeze a career of 20 years in just a few rows.

IMR: When most of the bands perform leather clad, sporting tattoos, ORPHANED LAND has a unique stage presentation and

costumes. Tell us more about it and how it reflects your culture?
Matti Svatitzki: Kobi, our vocalist, usually goes on stage wearing a galaba, which is a traditional Arab outfit. The other

band members, we used to go up on stage dressed up as orthodox Jewish people, and orthodox Muslim people. We wore these

outfits first of all because it's cool. It's a part of who we are and what our music is about. It is easier for audience who

doesn't know us to get connected to our music.

IMR: Along with guitars, bass and drums – there are a lot of "eastern folk music" instruments we get to hear on your albums –

tell us something more about them.
Matti Svatitzki: These instruments are also a lot about who we are. Middle Eastern folk metal is a style which we are its

pioneers, we started making it a long years ago and stayed with it since. We thought about how to bring into our music
instruments that are native and from the place we come from, and we use instruments from all around the Middle East, places

like Egypt, Turkey, Greece and even more. We use these instruments a lot in our albums, and also, when we can, in our live

shows as well.

IMR: Your latest album was mixed by Steven Wilson (PORCUPINE TREE) – how did this collaboration take place?
Matti Svatitzki: Steven is spends a lot of time in Israel since he is working with the local artist Aviv Geffen on their

project Blackfield. We got close to Steven during his stays here and got him interested in our music. Steven has worked and
produced legendary albums before, and it is a privilege that he is a good friend of ours, and that he's working with us. He

also sang one of our songs live in our last DVD and made a perfect 10 cover.

IMR: Your music tries to find the commonality between all the Abrahamic Religions (Judaism, Christianity and Islam) – how did

your culture/country influence you while choosing this theme for your albums?
Matti Svatitzki: Religion is a central issue in the world. Most of the world is religious, so talking about religion from our

point of view is a relevant thing. Israel is a place from which Judaism and Christianity came, Jesus was born and died
on the cross here, and some cities in Israel are extremely sacred for Muslims too. Places here are so sacred to people, that

they are really to fight and die for them, and this is exactly where our music and message fit in. We preach
for friendship and kindness between people, for ask people to keep open minds and try to see eye to eye with each other. We

have many fans in the Arab world, with whom we have very warm and positive relationship, and
we look at them as our brothers, sure not as enemies.

IMR: ORPHANED LAND is classified as Doom or more commonly Progressive Metal – how would you describe your overall sound?
Matti Svatitzki: I think we have been all over the place. There were times in the past when
we were considered a Doom-Death band, and in later times we were considered more Prog-Metal band. It depended on the mood we

were in and the music we listened to at home when we wrote the music.

IMR: Your music treads on a religious path – did you guys encounter any hurdles while touring etc?
Matti Svatitzki: Up until now there haven't been any extraordinary events. There were some minor anti-Semite events, some guy

waved a small Swastika pendant in my face and said "fuck off", and a few small things like that, but except for a few
assholes everything has been good so far.

IMR: Finally, a message from the band to their fans and budding musicians who are inspired by you guys. Thank You!
Matti Svatitzki: It is great that we have a fan base in India! We really love the place, and it is important for us that

people get to know and appreciate what we do. We 4 can't wait to play for you guys soon, see you there!
]]>
varun.kodo@gmail.com (Varun Kodolikar) Interviews Mon, 06 Feb 2012 02:51:20 +0000
Interview-Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM) http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-Ida-OlnianskyDIBBUKIM.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-Ida-OlnianskyDIBBUKIM.html

IdaOlnianskyInterview
IMR: Shalom Aleichem, Ida! Firstly, for a bit of background, can you tell us about DIBBUKIM, the music you guys play and how did the band come together? Also, does any of the member play in any other side-projects other than DIBBUKIM?

Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): Hi there Pravin! DIBBUKIM is a Yiddish Metal band which mixes "Klezmer Music" with Metal and thereby shaping somewhat of a new musical style. The lyrics are exclusively in Yiddish, and we are currently the only band around writing Metal material in that language.
It was actually my idea to start the band. Me and my husband, Niklas, had discussed starting a new Metal band for some time, and when I suggested that it should be done in Yiddish he immediately liked the idea and DIBBUKIM was born. We called our old friend Magnus Wohlfart who is a great guitarist and started to arrange and write songs.
Both Magnus and Jacob are also members in our label mates, YGGDRASIL, and I believe Jacob is a part of numerous other projects, PANDEMONIUM for example.


IMR: Okay, so your debut album, AZ A FOYGL UN A GOYLEM TANTSN is about to be launched soon what can you tell your fans about the music genre, lyrical themes and concept?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): Since our music style, mixes the old folk tradition "Klezmer Music" with Metal it’s inevitable that this also influences the lyrics. Partly because we have several covers on the album which lyrics were written in the time of the traditional Klezmer era. These tunes varies in themes, as some are quite wistful, like PAPIROSN and A MOL IZ GEVEN A MAYSE while others are happy like YIDL MITN FIDL. In our own material we try to incorporate the Old Folklore with modern problems, thus using characters like a shretl and a goylem but still talking about very contemporary issues.

IMR: DIBBUKIM's music comprises of mainly the traditional music and compositions rather than being more on the Metal side. What is your musical philosophy and what do you think is the bands(goal/mission)?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): Haha, I don’t know if that’s true. I think we are a bit more on the Metal side than strictly traditional, but maybe you have a point since we are very eager to show the traditional heritage on which our music stands. But this is not a goal, we simply want to create good and unique music which leaves an impression on the listener, if we can help spreading Yiddish culture by doing so this is a definite plus, but it’s not our goal.

IMR: For me, the cover-art for AZ A FOYGL UN A GOYLEM TANTSN seems to have a deeper meaning to it. Can you describe what it represents and perhaps a bit about the development process for the album-art?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): We had a quite clear idea from the start on how we wanted the artwork to be, so we sat down with our friend and artist Jean Hessel and told him about the concept. He then made a painting which I and Niklas altered a bit. And yeah, it does have a deeper meaning and I believe that everybody can make their own interpretation. The trapped and fragile bird could be a symbol of all the humans in the world who are prevented from living free by something inhuman and material. The bird can also be a metaphor for the Yiddish culture struggling to stay alive. The bird and the golem is also a representation of our musical style, a dance between Klezmer and Metal.

IMR: Please, excuse my lack of knowledge for the Yiddish language but what would OYFN VEG SHTEYT A BOYM translate to in English? What do the lyrics talk about and the concept behind the music video as I am in love with the song?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): OYFN VEG SHTEYT A BOYM means “by the road stands a tree”. The lyrics tell the story about a lonesome and windswept tree by the side of a road. All the birds have left the tree which makes a boy wish that he could be a bird and protect the lonely tree in the cold and rough winter. However, as the boy transforms into a bird his mother dresses him with to many and to heavy clothes and in the end he cannot fly to his beloved tree to shelter it.
The lyrics are of course a metaphor and there are numerous interpretations around. Some say that the tree stands for the holy land after the last Jewish revolt against the Romans, but it could also be a song about a mothers love for her son. I’ll leave it up for you to decide!

IMR: Could you tell us the importance behind keeping your song-titles in Yiddish language, as I feel there are positive and negative points if you consider(fans) world-wide? How important do you think is to share these myths and stories that you cover, with the whole world?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): Since there are many bands around, especially in the Folk Metal genre, who sings in other languages than English I don’t think that it’s any problem to sing in Yiddish. It’s not different from all the bands who sing in for example Swedish or Norwegian. Music is about getting a feeling through to the listener, and I believe you can achieve this in all the languages of the world.
The myths and the stories are something that comes with the territory. It’s not them we want to spread to the world, our mission is rather to present the Yiddish language in a new form and to a new audience.

IMR: As far as, the music of DIBBUKIM is concerned it is refreshingly unique and creative. What is the thing which secernate’s your band from the rest of Folk Metal bands?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): For one thing we come from a completely different musical tradition which differs quite a bit from the Northern-European Folk sound which is probably the sound primarily used by Folk Metal bands. The Yiddish language is of course also something that makes us unique as we and our brothers and sisters in the Industrial Metal band GEVOLT are the only metal bands in the world who use the language. Hopefully we also have something special in our own compositions which are typical for DIBBUKIM.

IMR: You guys are currently signed to GM Music. Is it a multi-album deal in the future and are the upcoming releases going to be on the same "pure folk" lines?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): We’ve not signed for more albums with GM, and who knows what will happen in the future. All I can say is that I’m very happy with the label work since our album is available in all the corners of the world. But if WARNER MUSIC calls I think it would be hard to turn them down. 
Even though we have started the work on a new album it’s far to early to say anything about the sound. We want to take our music to the next level and we’ll probably focus more on our own material. But sure, we will of course stay in the Folk Metal genre and continue to be inspired by the Klezmer tradition and write our songs in Yiddish.

IMR: Recently, there has been a news regarding the addition of Jacob Blecher(YGGDRASIL, PANDEMONIUM) to the current line-up of the band. Is that true and will it remain this way or are any other changes going to come?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): Yeah, that’s correct! Jacob has been a part of the band a while and It has been great working with him, he is a really cool guy. Right now we don’t have any plans on changing the line-up since we work very well together, but who knows what the future brings?

IMR: Which musicians have inspired you in the beginning of your career? Any “favorite-idols” that you would like to encounter one day?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): I think that THE BEATLES are actually my biggest source of inspiration as a musician and song writer. I don’t know if it’s noticeable in our music, but they have been a big part of my life. So even though it’s not possible I’d like to meet John Lennon one day, he’s in my opinion the greatest musician who has ever lived.
When it comes to Metal I think I get my inspiration from all the bands I like. Whether it’s very straight forward and heavy like MANOWAR or Progressive and dynamic like AYREON there are elements which truly inspires me.

IMR: On a personal note, what is your opinion regarding the people who enunciate that Women don't belong to the Metal scene?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): Well, what can I say? Opinions like that are simply ridiculous and sad. I think it’s time for people to start defining each other as individuals and human beings rather than being fixated on gender… It’s truly such a small part of who we really are. But I must say that I haven’t encountered any of these people so far. Instead I’ve heard a lot of positive things from people who thinks it’s cool with women in metal.

IMR: Being a Yiddish Folk Metal band, what are the various modes of promotion that you guys are currently carrying on as language some or the other way will act as a barrier?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): We probably use the same promotion tactics as any other band. We try to be seen everywhere and hopefully our language will help us get noticed instead of acting like a barrier.

IMR: Okay, now here's something that I really need to know, suppose if I visit Sweden what are the best things that I should watch out for (all the famous things)?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): Haha, that’s a tricky one. It’s hard to grasp the beauty in things you see every day, but in my opinion you should definitely visit my home town Lund, it’s a beautiful city which hasn’t been altered much through the years and has kept a lot of old buildings. Further more you should come during winter when it snows and the Swedish nature presents itself at its best.

IMR: Are you guys in plan of a tour to promote your debut release? What bands do you dream on playing on a festival or tour with?
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): At the moment we have complete focus on the album and haven’t started to plan any live shows. I think it would have been cool to do a world tour with our Yiddish Metal colleagues in GEVOLT, spreading the mystic powers of the Yiddish language all over the world! But of course, I also dream of touring with all my favorite bands like AXXIS, ORPHANED LAND, MANOWAR, LUMSK, RHAPSODY, TÝR, ALICE COOPER. Well, there are a lot of great bands out there. 

IMR: Thank you very much for your answers. It is quite interesting to learn about Folk Metal from the musicians. Tell us your next plans for the future and let us conjure you farewell and wish good luck to the band!
Ida Olniansky(DIBBUKIM): Thanks for your questions, I’ve truly enjoyed the interview! When it comes to the future I first of all hope that many people will enjoy our new album and that they want to hear more from us. Secondly I already look forward to start composing new songs and my mind is currently spinning around the concept for a second album. Hopefully we’ll also be able to do some live shows, but our main goal is to create more music and enjoy the ride!

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lordmessiah@yahoo.com (Pravin Prajapati) Interviews Wed, 20 Apr 2011 09:48:29 +0000
Interview-Christian Svendsen(TSJUDER) http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-Christian-SvendsenTSJUDER.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-Christian-SvendsenTSJUDER.html

ChristianSvendsenTsjuder
IMR: Greetings Anti–Christian, How is everything going on with you and your band TSJUDER?
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): Hi there, everything is going good, recording and rehearsing new songs.

IMR: You have been associated with  TSJUDER since 10 years now(including the ruptures). Tell us  about the perceptions of TSJUDER you had  before you joined in?
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): I didn’t know them, but I used to play with the ISVIND guys before became ISVIND, and Arak played with TSJUDER in the beginning, so he asked me if I wanted to play with TSJUDER. And so, this is how it went.

IMR: The very next year after you joined in you had to endure from "Tendinitis" on both arms and  had to leave the band, tell us about the time when you were away from the band? After you came back, did you face any challenges as such, in coping with the band-musically or otherwise?
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): I was not used to play such extreme stuff and didn’t have the acknowledgement about warming up and stretching out, so my arms didn’t handle it. but after a break I got a routine before practice and  concerts.  It was no problem coming back after the injury.

IMR: Tell us about the hiatus that the band had taken in 2006. What were the major resolutions when you guys got back together? 
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): We were just tired I think  and I had a lot to do and the other guys got some kids, so it went pretty naturally. The main reason is that life is pretty boring and we missed making destructive music together.

IMR: Do you have any side projects?
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): Yes I do. The main one is a band called THE CUMSHOTS and I’ve been in the band since 1999, and recorded 4 albums and we won a Norwgian Grammy for "Best Metal Album" last year. I also play in a Grindcore band called BEATEN TO DEATH among others.

IMR: The band confirmed last year that they will be playing at the Wacken Open Air festival 2011? How is the scenario since 
then?Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): Since then we have been booked for Hellfest, Brutal Assault, and there probably be a tour this fall 
if everything comes together.

IMR: Tell us about TSJUDER’s upcoming release? Any experiences as(in its making) that you would like to share? What should people expect from this release?
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): We are finished recording it but still have to mix and master it. It’s called LEGION HELVETE and I am very pleased about the result so far.  It’s going to be released in the month of August 2011.

IMR: Favorite color – Black or White?   
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): Black and White.

IMR: What exactly is the scene of Black Metal in Norway off lately?
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): It’s not that extreme as it used to be but that is how it is all over the world today. The focus is more on making better music, but we still have our image, we’re a old band with old people and we don’t change easily.

IMR: Do you feel that Black Metal has lost its concept and intensity musically and the intent that the ancestor’s of the genre in the previous era’s used to carry?
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): There are some in the genre that still hate Christians and burn churches but it don’t have anything new to it. So I feel that old-school where more punk that new bands have today. But for my sake I don’t care.

IMR: Where do you see the Black Metal scene has headed today globally?
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): Both underground and commerce, and I don’t think it’s gonna change that much in the future. The only thing maybe fusing other genre in to it , but I only know one band who have made that successfully and that’s the Norwegian, SHINING.

IMR: Thanks for taking the time to Interview, wishing you to spread darkness and evil with your upcoming album.
Anti-Christian(Tsjuder): Thank you very much. Hails!

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nocturnalqueen@gmail.com (Anish Bhattacharjee) Interviews Mon, 04 Apr 2011 10:03:08 +0000
Talanas-Band Interview(On The Waspkeeper's Pre-Launch) http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Talanas-Band-InterviewOn-The-Waspkeeper-s-Pre-Launch.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Talanas-Band-InterviewOn-The-Waspkeeper-s-Pre-Launch.html

TalanasInterview
IMR: Greetings Hal Sinden! Before we start off the interview I was wondering if you could give a short introduction about the band’s inception for our readers and also the significance behind the band’s name TALANAS, how does it fit the band’s style ofmusic?

HAL: Greetings, and thank you for reading! TALANAS started in September 2008 immediately after the demise of INTERLOCK - the industrial metal band that Joe & I were in(signed to ANTICULTURE RECORDS). We struggled for ages to come up with a decent name as so many have been taken now by tiny, one-person bedroom bands on MySpace. Eventually, we found talanas completely by mistake whilst looking for names of beasts & mythical animals, it turns out it's a type of insect and have recently discovered that's it's also a solar phenomenon. The name itself has been quite useful since it’s unusual and hard to forget. We could’ve gone with one of the more ‘fashionable’ long emo names like ‘November My Cold Heart Betrothed’ or some othernonsense but TALANAS seems to grab some attention in a good way.

IMR: TALANAS was formed after splitting INTERLOCK, what was the main thought behind the inception of TALANAS. Also, how did you get in touch with Ewan Parry and Mark Duffy and what made you eventually decide that yes this should be the final line-upof the band?
JOE: When INTERLOCK split, it was literally the next week that Hal and I were back at the studio getting as much material out and demoed up so we could start the hunt for other members.
HAL: Whilst we were in INTERLOCK, we toured America, England & parts of Europe and had actually completely recorded a second album that will now never be heard, so there were quite a few people that wanted to hear more material from us. However, we didn't want to create simply a second INTERLOCK and instead we felt we needed to make music that was more organic/less machine-like than before - we'd sort of lost touch with what it meant to write properly as a band. Admittedly, it did take a while to get things going musically and I’d say that the present style of talanas didn’t really take form until Ewan & Duff had joined.
JOE: When it came to looking for the rest of the line up, we tried out mates and it took a while to find the right people for the mix. I have been working with Duff on and off for years. We used to play in bands together when I was studying at ACM. We used to play things from Hardcore to Punk, Metal to Samba. It really was a mixed bag! I knew that Duff was always up for doing more music so I asked him to come and try out. I knew Ewan from school; we've also been in bands together since first meeting way back when. We used to notoriously play the Ren & Stimpy theme tune on an acoustic guitar and an empty guitar case together, I like to think we've moved on from that now, but when Ewan came into place we felt very much as a unit and work started towards creating what we now know as the sound of TALANAS. We also had our original keyboard player Rick, who left due to commitments with his project ACRYLIC SPIKE PROJECT. He was shortly replaced by Josiah Lutton of THE FURIOUS HORDE who appeared on the REASON & ABSTRACT(E.P), but he also left due to commitments with his other projects. We're now very comfortable as a four piece and I think that we are very happy to carry on as we are.
HAL: I think it took about a year or so for us to solidify the objective of the band as a musical entity, we’re now fairly clear about who we are and what we’re about. TALANAS is first & foremost here for us to create the kind of music we’d like to hear and that isn’t currently available anywhere, as far as we know. We mix what we adore in Extreme Metal with some of the darker aspects of 80s & early 90s Alternative & mainstream music.

IMR: Coming onto the new album titled THE WASPKEEPER, you guys are almost done with the recording of the album and is set for release in April, is there anything that you’re particularly excited about? What can the fans expect from the penultimate show of the promotional tour?
EWAN:
I’m just really excited to finally get these tracks out there and heard by people. Some of the songs on this album we started working on about a year and a half ago, so I think we’re all dying to see people’s reactions to them.
HAL: I’m excited about showing people what we can do and what we’re all about in more than just three songs. The EP was a great chance to get people interested in TALANAS whilst not having to sit through too much, but it’s difficult to convey the extent of your artistic vocabulary in just under twenty minutes.
The live field is something we’re still being extremely selective with. I spent the best part of nearly a decade gigging constantly throughout the UK and other areas, I’ve exhausted the need to play any old venue simply because it exists. My priority now is to assess the quality of the venue & the billing before confirming the booking since both of those factors,when not considered, can lead to an audience making very quick & negative decisions about a band before employing any objectivity about factors such as poor mixing desks, bad PA rigs, substandard stages etc. My aim is to present a live show that sounds good enough to complement what our listeners like most about the recorded material whilst having enough physical space to put on a good & entertaining show.
JOE: I'm excited to hear what people think to our sound, especially coming on from our previous release. I think it shows the listener how much darker and heavier we can be and lets them hear the fuller sonic spectrum that we are capable of. I can’t wait to perform the tracks live and to get a true reaction from an audience.

IMR: What can you tell us about the concept of THE WASPKEEPER? How would you describe the sound of your upcoming album?
EWAN: I think the sound is of course still recognisable as us and continues on from the sound of the REASON & ABSTRACT(E.P), but there’s a lot more we’ve been able to fit in to a full length album, so there’s a much broader scope. There’s influences that are perhaps more apparent on this album that I don’t think anyone would have picked out from the EP. In particular, while there’s still plenty of metal riffage, there are a lot more clean passages, and some extended Progressive/Experimental parts that a short EP just doesn’t afford you the space to do.
HAL: It’s not explicitly a concept album as such, however there is a theme that runs throughout most of its lyrical angles; that of suffering grudges. I’ve come to regard my propensity for holding onto memories, both good & bad, as like keeping wasps - it’s utterly pointless, they don’t provide anything and can only ever hurt you, yet you become addicted to keeping something alive.
At this stage I find it’s difficult to describe the overall sound of the album accurately from this side of having just made it, I find I’m still standing too close to the piece to be fully objective about it. I know that the intention was to create Death Metal with more than just two dimensions to it and not to shy away from having introspective moments or strong melodies without having to sound like KILLSWITCH ENGAGE or IN FLAMES. I’d really like to be able to provide a occasional clean & harmonious passages to extreme metal and not to have to be lumped in with the same list of bands again(OPETH, for one) just because we’ve dared to turn off the distortion every now and again.
JOE: Well the sound is very dark, experimental and raw. There are a lot of places visited in the album, musically.

IMR: What did you focus on the new album? The modern sound, the ambience, a compound mixture of these things or something experimental? What or who are the main inspirations behind the band and lyrically?
HAL: I think all of the biggest influences on our sound have been bands that have in some way been innovators, creating something that really was distinct and that hadn’t come before. I haven’t necessarily been aware of consciously making sure we had a ‘modern’ sound, but then I’m also not really interested at all in vintage or Traditional Metal and neither are the other guys, so I suppose we’d never have had a retro approach to our sound.
Something I was very aware of wanting to do is introduce more of the quiet passages and clean sections. It wasn’t really a big priority for me to create a wall-to-wall body of tunes that were running at 200bpm and tearing everyone’s faces off. We just do that occasionally(!).Funnily enough, the one band we all very much agree on is FIELDS OF THE NEPHILIM. I don’t think that means we’re a Goth band, and they had always tried to distance themselves from the goth tag, but they created such varied music from album to album that always such amazing depth. AKERCOCKE are also a big influence, as are acts like TEARS FOR FEARS and PORCUPINE TREE.
Lyrically, my main influences are David Sylvian, Andrew Eldritch & Brendan Perry. I find it’s really important to have lyrics that you can attach yourself to in some way rather than just filling spaces for vowels to accompany the right melodies. The lyrics on this album are very much reflective of the past few years in my life, in some cases relating to specific events which are probably safer kept as cryptic reference for now, however there are also political messages in songs such as ‘a fortune worth its disguise’ and ‘penetralium’.
EWAN: What I really aim to do is to write material that, however varied the influence and sound, still has a kind of cohesiveness to it. In other words, even though all the songs sound different, you still know you’re listening to the same band. All those things mentioned are in there; a modern sound, ambient sections, certainly experimentation, we try to make it all tie together nicely.
Musical inspirations for me are usually things that have a big dramatic impact. I do like music that’s very technical or clever, but it has to have some energy to it as well, not just cleverness for its own sake. In terms of metal, I’m a big fan of NEUROSIS, SIKTH, AKERCOCKE, MY DYING BRIDE and so on. There’s plenty of non-metal influences going on as well, I know we’re all massive fans of FIELDS OF THE NEPHILIM, I’m also keen on really experimental stuff like KAYO DOT or EINSTURZENDE NEUBAUTEN.Films have also played a part in our writing, whether it’s a specific reference to a film soundtrack, or the feel of a particular film.

IMR: No doubt, there is whole lot varied influences in your music ranging from MESHUGGAH, IHASHN, SPAWN OF POSSESSION, OPETH and the likes but with a very different unique and modern sound, how do you react to the such comparisons made by fans?
HAL: People will always hear different things in different ways, it’s inevitable for anything that’s so subjective. Personally, I don’t really mind if whoever wants to make any comparison they so choose, the only time I ever react badly to it is when someone suggests that we absolutely and conclusively had set out to copy a certain band or artist. For example, there was a recent critique written about our REASON & ABSTRACT(E.P) where the journalist straight-up said that as a vocalist I was clearly trying to copy Mikael Åkerfeldt, which is total nonsense. Ewan quite likes OPETH, I don’t dislike them, but saying I sound anything like Mikael is very odd let alone trying to suggest that I’m actually setting out to copy him. It’s never even occurred to me to emulate him as a singer, and as far as clean vocals go I’m far more influenced directly by singers like Colin Vearncombe, Dave Gahan, David Bowie, David Sylvian and Scott Walker. I think instead the problem is that people hear a clean voice that’s not a styled like an emo band and that’s surrounded by Death Metal and immediately think “oh, that’s OPETH” which I hope will change.
EWAN: It’s always really interesting to hear the comparisons people make, especially because most of the time everyone comes up with slightly different comparisons. To me this is a really good sign because it means you’re doing something that every listener has their own interpretation of, rather than simply sounding like a typical metal band, or a clone of a particularband.
The OPETH comparison in particular is an interesting one. It has been mentioned a lot, but in fact I don’t think they’re as strong an influence as people seem to make out. I personally am quite a big fan of them, but I actually haven’t drawn that much conscious influence from them when writing this material. I guess the comparison mainly comes from the mix of Metal andNon-Metal styles (especially Progressive), and the mix of death vocals and clean singing. It’s not something I have a problem with, but it’s not what I’d expected.
JOE: It’s always very flattering to be said to sound like our influences, especially the ones we hold with very high regard. It’s very humbling to hear that what we're doing is striking people in the right way.

IMR: Frankly speaking, I’m quite impressed with the production of the upcoming album. It sounds really fresh and gumptious. How was the overall experience in the making of this extreme record with Jaime Gomez Arellano (Ulver, Cathedral)?
HAL: I’m sure Gomez won’t mind me saying that he definitely put us through our paces with this record. He mixed & mastered the debut EP, but this time around he was also involved in the recording of it and we spent a lot of time going over every last detail. I’ve known him for years and he played drums when I sang in a band called CORPSING who were signed to AKERCOCKE’s label GOAT OF MENDES RECORDS. He’s an absolute taskmaster and is extremely specific about the sounds he wants in the core of the music(guitars, drums), I’m aware that we presented quite a challenge in having to record & mix such a huge drumkit like Joe’s alongside all the variance in the vocal stylings.
What Gomez has done with the album is very much what we wanted. We had faced continuous delays for nearly two years with the REASON & ABSTRACT(E.P) before settling with using him to mix & master it, what it meant was that we ended up with a release that sounded the best it could and not at all like a demo. My objective with using someone of Gomez’s calibre as a produceris to make sure that we lessen the opportunity for anyone to dismiss the release because of its sound and instead that any issue a journalist or listener can have is with the material itself. It’s a much more honest way of going about things and I can safely say that we sound as good now as I’d ever want to, there were no corners cut.
EWAN: We worked with Gomez on the EP and were really pleased with how it sounded, so we were definitely set on having him produce the album. It was great this time to be working with him from the very beginning, since one of the nightmare issues with the EP was switching between producers who all work differently. Some of the tracks on this album are very complexmix-wise so I was really impressed with how professionally Gomez handled it. I really like that the mixes have punch while still sounding nice and clear, it’s modern sounding without having too much of that kind of ‘gloss’ that takes the impact out of many contemporary mixes.
JOE: Well for me recording drums, he very much wanted to get a deeper tone from my kit. We spent a day re-skinning and tuning the kit and basically spending time with the drums and making sure that everything was at its finest for the recording. As soon as we had it all set up he handed it over to me and I just sat in the studio until it was done. It got the best out of me, just being by myself and not having people I didn’t really know looking at me whilst trying to nail some of the more challenging passages on the album. But all in all, I'm really pleased with the overall sound he's got from the kit. I suppose that’s why we keep using him!

IMR: One thing that striked me instantly was the musical patterns followed on THE WASPKEEPER which is pretty varied and complex at the same time, ranging from Brutal to Technical influences. What are each of the band member’s musical background, and how did the love for such diversified music come about?
HAL: I reckon the reason we have a fairly diverse sound is because none of us is prepared to limit what we consider for inclusion, we’re just not interested in representing some totally backwards, exclusive ‘club’ ethos to Metal as if you’re only allowed to listen to first prints of the first three MANOWAR albums on vinyl.
For me, I was technically a latecomer to Metal. I didn’t go through the usual route of METALLICA, MEGADETH & IRON MAIDEN and instead went straight from Goth into Extreme Metal. My parents were very adamant at making sure I appreciated as much varied music as possible, from Classical Music to Classic Rock, from Van Morrison to Vangelis. I find that I need to be challenged in some way by the music I listen to so I tend to gravitate towards slightly more odd or Avantgarde Music.
EWAN: I’ve personally had quite a vast range of influences since I started playing music. I guess I first picked up the guitar mainly because of bands like PANTERA, and some of the more mainstream Metal or Rock bands. I’ve had phases of being into all kinds of music, at time including stuff that wasn’t really guitar-centric at all. The main thing for me was that where I grew up, there weren’t many other people who were necessarily into the same things I liked, which I think actually gave me more freedom to just listen to anything at all without caring what people thought. I’d hear about bands from loads of different people, which meant being exposed to a lot of radically different styles of music.
JOE: Well the one thing we always strive to do within our music is to make something that we haven’t heard before. My musical background comes from playing in garage bands with Ewan back in our youth to playing in marching bands with a local Boys Brigade. I've attended schooling from the ACM in Guildford and now I teach under the watchful eye of my drum tutor, Glenn Clarke. I draw influence to my playing from genres such as Progreesive, Experimental, Industrial, World, Doom, some Hardcore and all the various forms of Metal(obviously). I do find myself taking influence from the drumming luminaries such as Bozzio, Portnoy and TOOL's Danny Carey. Their big kit playing has really shaped the way I now look at kit playing. I feel they have opened my eyes to the world of bigger sound sources and not limiting the sounds you can use to convey your art.
DUFF: We have certainly all come to this with different influences, however we so have tonnes of middle ground. I personally have come from a fair amount of more mainstream Metal with lots of Jazz, Classical and Black Metal thrown in.

IMR: After going through your Press Release, I found there are many special guests featuring on the debut album. What is the reason behind so many famous faces on the debut full-length, is it some kind of marketing for the album?
HAL: No, not really. I’ve actually known all three of the guest vocalists for a while as friends, in each case we made the decision to include them on the basis of believing they’d really bring something to the track they feature on.
With Jason Mendonca, he was originally set to perform as a guest vocalist on the second, unreleased INTERLOCK album. I’ve known him since I first started gigging on the UK Underground Death Metal scene in the nineties which was when AKERCOCKE were starting to become very popular. We had actually sent him some tracks really early on in the development of the TALANAS album, but we soon realised that his vocals would work really well on ‘penetralium’. I’ve always been a big fan of his very definitive style of extreme vocals and he was an absolute pleasure to work with in the studio; he came in and completely nailed the really long screams that I had written for the parts as well as the super-low stuff.
James Tait (‘JD Quintus’ from THE MEADS OF ASPHODEL) is a longstanding friend of mine from ages ago. He & I first started working together in bands when we were about sixteen years old and we definitely grew together as singers & musicians, both of us learnt techniques at similar times. We’ve a long history of appearing as guests on eachother’s projects and this is simply another exchange in that respect. ‘a fortune worth its disguise’ is very much the two of us working together in the way we’re used to.
Some people may not immediately know of Adam Ever, but I’m confident that that will be changing pretty soon since From Great Height are really gaining a lot of profile at the moment. From when I first heard his band a few years ago, on the recommendation of some close friends, I noticed that he & I share a lot of similarities in our approach to clean vocals; there’s a lot of influence from classic 80s music. On ‘messaline’, I think the way that he appears works really nicely, especially his backing vocals in the middle clean section and the harmony duet with me in the outro.

IMR: You guys have a track called AORTA, heard a lot about it and a ton times. Can you tell us what the track is all about?
HAL: It’s funny, it really does seem like quite a favourite with a lot of people so far. The lyrics are about my feelings towards religion’s position on death. I was raised as a casual Christian, in particular in the denomination of the Church of England. When I was about thirteen years old, I found out that a good while ago some pretty bad stuff happened to my family and that a Catholic priest had commented on it in relation to damnation & purgatory, it resulted in me turning completely 180 degrees on my faith. I found myself wanting to oppose Christianity in any way that I could and I discovered Satanism. A few years later, when I’d stopped being such a moody, puberty-ridden teenager, I discovered that in actively practising Satanism I was still essentially operating in the same circles and belief system but simply from a mirrored view, and that instead I found I had no need for it or any other prescribed construct of spirituality.
Rather than opposing religion entirely though, I think that in certain circumstances it can be valuable to those dealing with loss or facing their own death. With that said, I’m just not happy with someone being provided with something that’s supposed to help but that’s so inextricably linked to fear & guilt. It’s too early in my life for me to know or say how I’ll deal with my own inevitable demise, but I thought about some recent deaths that were close to me and how I feel about many organised religion’s perspectives on them, and ‘aorta’ appeared. It’s essentially the rallying cry for those who know they’ll die a Godless death, free of debt to something that can’t even be proven.

IMR: If you could put together one off your dream show with 4 bands, past or present, with whom would TALANAS love to share the stage with and why?
HAL: 4 bands? I’d have the ‘Going to California’ lineup of TEARS OF FEARS as headliners, since it was when I feel they were hitting their hardest and tightest. They were a stunning stadium act on that tour and the songs sounded so much more visceral whilst being completely on-the-mark. I also feel that we could tailor our live set to mean that we wouldn’t alienate more of a Pop/Alternative crowd.
As main support, I’d have FIELDS OF THE NEPHILIM, but probably the ‘Visionary Heads’ live lineup. They were always an absolutely stellar live band with their original lineup, but I’d say that they were at the top of their game at that point in 1990.
Next down the bill would be MY DYING BRIDE and to be honest I couldn’t really decide if I’d prefer the ‘For Darkest Eyes’ lineup or the present live lineup that features David Gray from AKERCOCKE on drums, they’re both amazing. They so rarely tour the UK these days and it’s always a pleasure to see them on any stage, plus Aaron gives such an amazing performance as a frontman, it’s a treat to experience.
Next is AKERCOCKE, and really from any era. They’ve consistently put on completely solid, incendiary performances from their whole career to date and are one of the few bands I willingly lose it to in the pit when watching. Given this dream lineup though, it’d be fascinating to see them play mostly the more weird, Progressive stuff that they’ve done. I’m confident that anyone turning up to see them would also really appreciate our set as well.
Finally, as the opening band, would be TALANAS. The big change I’d make though is that it’d be a stadium tour and each act’s set would be at least 45 minutes long so the audience would get the full experience of each group throughout.

IMR: TALANAS played at the main stage of Fusion at the Elgiva Theatre. How was it for you and the band and does it compare to other festivals you have played?
HAL: Fusion was amazing. I’d actually played it once before with INTERLOCK a good few years before and it’s always extremely well organised. It’s held in a full scale, fully working, modern theatre so it gave talanas a chance to express ourselves on the size of stage that’s absolutely ideal for everything we want to present. The lightshow was also amazing and we had our Tour Manager Alan Luckett doing sound for us which we pretty much always insist on.
The other really valuable thing about playing Fusion is that it’s a very young crowd, they’re completely unjaded and willingly to show their enjoyment on a very immediate level. Compared with other festivals, it’s certainly pretty mixed across the board and depends on where you’re playing. As a whole, I’d say I probably prefer playing festivals than single gigs but the absolute highlight of any I’ve played was definitely Hellfest in Clisson, France. That was absolutely mental and is the biggest crowd I’ve ever played to. It’s my permanent point of reference for why I’m in this business.
JOE: It was an amazing show and such a relief to play on a stage where we actually physically fit and can use all the elements we bring to our live show. As far as all the stages I've played on, it was definitely one of the biggest and such a lovely venue too!

IMR: What are the touring plans behind THE WASPKEEPER and do they include the India by any chance or any Asian countries?
HAL: We’ll certainly tour, we won’t be writing off the idea of doing that in any way, but as I’ve said it’s more of a case of wanting to be selective about it. The plans are to get on the road possibly around October of this year, but it will be the UK and most likely a co-headline tour with a relevant British act of a similar genre, we have a few ‘irons in the fire’ so to speak.
We’d LOVE to do some Indian & Asian shows. Bands like TESSERACT have show the UK that India is very much ‘on the map’ for metal and we’d go mad for the chance to be invited to come out there. Springfest & Great Indian Rock are events that look amazing. Just tell us where you want us to be!
JOE: Well I know that we are looking to get out to as many places as we can but it’s all down to whether or not we can get out there. With interlock we managed to get round the United States and Europe but getting further afield is always a desire we'd like to fulfil.

IMR: Alright Hal, time to wrap up the interview. Thank you again for doing this interview. Do you have any final thoughts or comments for our readers?
HAL: Thanks again for taking the time to check us out and provide such insightful questions. The Indian Metal scene is really starting to make an impact over here and with bands such as MESHUGGAH & TESSERACT coming back with such glowing reports of how Indian gigs have gone, it’s meaning that it’s becoming a very desirable place to aim towards playing. I’m also extremely pleased to see the diversity of Metal acts coming from India, I really hope that we get some more exports appearing both ways.

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lordmessiah@yahoo.com (Pravin Prajapati) Interviews Wed, 30 Mar 2011 08:10:34 +0000
Interview: Julia Flansburg(Angelical Tears) http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-Julia-FlansburgAngelical-Tears.html http://indianmusicrevolution.com/international/interviews/Interview-Julia-FlansburgAngelical-Tears.html

Julia

IMR: Hello Julia Flansburg and thank you for this interview with IndianMusicRevolution. Would you please start off by telling us a bit about ANGELICAL TEARS inception and how you became a member of the band for our readers?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
Glenn and I decided to start a band, with a sound different than most other bands around.  He wanted the name to be something with angels and I wanted the name to be something with tears. So we just combined two names – ANGELICAL TEARS. That’s how it all started.

IMR: Also, I would also like to congratulate you guys on behalf of Team IMR for the release of your self-titled debut ANGELICAL TEARS(E.P). How had been the reactions so far from the fans and media?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
Thank you! So far, the reception has been great. It really has surprised a lot of people and we’ve been steadily gaining new fans. Initial reviews have been very positive, so all in all, we are very happy with the reception it has received.

IMR: How are things going in the studio, are you guys writing and recording at the moment for your full-length record?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
We are in the process of writing new material, but we do not expect to go into the studio to  record until later in 2011. The music will be a step forward for us with more keys, heavier guitar, etc.

IMR: ANGELICAL TEARS(E.P) really comprises of some potent gothic influences along with scorching guitar solos and beautiful keyboards. Tell us how did you guys manage to produce such a power-packed sound for your first release?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
The band has had its share of personnel changes since it was started and we’ve now managed to put together the right combination of musicians. Mike Finucane at ECHOLODGE STUDIOS both engineered and produced the CD. He provided some valuable feedback that helped shape the final sound of the songs.

IMR: Tell us about your concept and lyrical inspirations for the songs and what did you guys tried to project with ANGELICAL TEARS(E.P)?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
The lyrical content was written primarily by me. Steven, our guitarist, helped with the lyrics on  CHASING ETERNITY With the exception of CHASING ETERNITY, which was practically a compete rewrite in the studio, the material just kind of sprouted up as the band grew from its founding. We tend to write about life experiences or at least songs inspired by them rather than fantasy subjects.  On the EP, the songs just all happened to focus on relationships.

IMR: Which song has the most personal meaning to you, and why?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
All songs are personal to me, since I write about my experience and feelings. But probably the most personal is CHASING ETERNITY.  It’s about a long distance relationship. You meet a person, but he/she lives far away from you. It’s hard not to see him/her every day. Those lyrics came from my real life experience.

IMR: How would you describe your music to grab some potential music listeners who have not yet heard the new album?  
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
Comparisons with other bands in the genre are hard to avoid, but the set of influences ranging from Classical, to Goth, to Alternative, to Metal gives us a sound that is uniquely ours.

IMR: On a personal note, tell us about your musical background and training. Did you always want to become a singer? What are your hobbies or other things that you love to do other than music?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
My musical background started with 7 years of piano lessons. But prior that when I was about 3, I was playing with a potato masher – pretending that it was my microphone and singing different songs into it. Then about a year ago I started taking voice lessons from Regina Grimaldi.  These lessons really helped me with a lot with my vocal strength.

IMR: The band recently announced Tanner Hodgkinson(Drummer) after parting ways with the former member John Kenerson, did this anyway changed the way the band played or how the band sounded?. Also, we would like to know who amongst the two gave drums for ANGELICAL TEARS (E.P)?  
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
Tanner joined the band after the E.P had already been released.  He was also out drummer prior to John.  John did the work in the studio and is a good drummer and a solid time keeper, but Tanner has a much more aggressive playing style that really give the band a more driving feel. The rhythm section in a band has much more to do with the band’s sounds than it is sometimes given credit for. Tanner’s style will definitely have a positive impact when we release our next CD.

IMR: Would you like to share few words about the recent shows that the band did for the ANGELICAL TEARS(E.P) launch?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
We had our CD release show at the Hidden Castle in Norman, Oklahoma (go Sooners!). Lots of people there and the band did very well. You have good shows and bad shows, but this one was exceptionally good.

IMR: ANGELICAL TEARS music comprises of diversified musical styles. How do you prepare yourself for vocal delivery that ranges high to low while performing on - stage?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
Of course a few warm ups here and there. That’s pretty much it.

IMR: Today most of the bands race to get themselves on bigger record labels for their musical promotion. How much you guys are satisfied after having a deal inked with the Australian record label BLUEFREYA?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
Karl at BLUEFREYA is himself a musician and is  into this genre of music so he understands what we’re about. We obviously want as many people as possible to hear our music, but we are not in a huge rush to get to a big record label. We’re excited that we are getting the chance to work with BLUEFREYA and are satisfied with the relationship so far.

IMR: How has working with BLUEFREYA been in terms of promotion? Have ANGELICAL TEARS been afforded a budget to film a music video for a song taken from the E.P prior to hitting the road this fall?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
BLUEFREYA  is just starting out, but has a promising future. The agreement we entered into with BLUEFREYA was for Australian distribution and promotion; funds for a video really weren’t part of the deal. We’ve been discussing the possibility of a video within the band and have been approached by people wanting to do one, but we have no definite plans as of yet.

IMR: Any plans for ANGELICAL TEARS to tour internationally or overseas with the release of bands full-length album which is scheduled for 2011 release?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
We have really been humbled by the following we are starting to gain overseas (which we are tracking primarily through social media sites such as Facebook and Myspace). We would certainly love to meet our supporters outside of the U.S., so playing overseas in on our wish list and we hope we get to do so.

IMR: Thank you very much, Julia Flansburg. I just cannot wait to listen to the full-length upcoming album. Do you have any parting words for your fans at IndianMusicRevolution?
Julia(ANGELICAL TEARS):
Keep listening to our music! We can’t wait to finish our new songs, so our fans can hear our growth musically.  New songs should be more aggressive, but melodic at the same time.

Pravin Prajapati(LordMessiah)

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lordmessiah@yahoo.com (Pravin Prajapati) Interviews Thu, 25 Nov 2010 10:24:57 +0000